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Comverse technology backdating scandal

Although the FSP’s mission is closely tied to that of the AF/MLU, it does have a separate mission statement which is documented as follows: The mission of the FSP is to support the forfeiture component of all major FBI investigations through data entry and analysis of financial documents, forensic accounting, and tracing assets subject to forfeiture.

Based upon field office crime surveys, current trends in the White Collar Crime arena, and directives established by the President, the Attorney General, and the Criminal Investigative Division, the following national priorities for the White Collar Crime Program have been established: Public Corruption, Corporate Fraud/Securities Fraud, Health Care Fraud, Financial Institution Fraud, Insurance Fraud and Money Laundering.

The mission of the Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Unit (AF/MLU) is to promote the strategic use of asset forfeiture and to ensure that field offices employ the money laundering violation in all investigations, where appropriate, to disrupt and/or dismantle criminal enterprises.

The AF/MLU also has responsibilities for the management of the Forfeiture Support Project (FSP) in Calverton, Maryland.

The following notable statistical accomplishments are reflective in FY 2006 for Corporate Fraud:

Although the FSP’s mission is closely tied to that of the AF/MLU, it does have a separate mission statement which is documented as follows: The mission of the FSP is to support the forfeiture component of all major FBI investigations through data entry and analysis of financial documents, forensic accounting, and tracing assets subject to forfeiture.Based upon field office crime surveys, current trends in the White Collar Crime arena, and directives established by the President, the Attorney General, and the Criminal Investigative Division, the following national priorities for the White Collar Crime Program have been established: Public Corruption, Corporate Fraud/Securities Fraud, Health Care Fraud, Financial Institution Fraud, Insurance Fraud and Money Laundering.The mission of the Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Unit (AF/MLU) is to promote the strategic use of asset forfeiture and to ensure that field offices employ the money laundering violation in all investigations, where appropriate, to disrupt and/or dismantle criminal enterprises.The AF/MLU also has responsibilities for the management of the Forfeiture Support Project (FSP) in Calverton, Maryland.The following notable statistical accomplishments are reflective in FY 2006 for Corporate Fraud: $1.2 billion in Restitutions, $41.5 million in Recoveries, $14.2 million in Fines, and $62.6 million in Seizures. (Comverse) is a New York-based designer and manufacturer of telecommunication systems and software, with reported revenues of $1.2 billion in FY 2005.The chart below is reflective of the number of pending cases from FY 2002 through FY 2006. In August 2006, former Comverse Chief Executive Officer Kobi Alexander, former Chief Financial Officer David Kreinberg, and former General Counsel William Sorin were charged with various types of fraud related to illegal compensation of Comverse executives.

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Although the FSP’s mission is closely tied to that of the AF/MLU, it does have a separate mission statement which is documented as follows: The mission of the FSP is to support the forfeiture component of all major FBI investigations through data entry and analysis of financial documents, forensic accounting, and tracing assets subject to forfeiture.

Based upon field office crime surveys, current trends in the White Collar Crime arena, and directives established by the President, the Attorney General, and the Criminal Investigative Division, the following national priorities for the White Collar Crime Program have been established: Public Corruption, Corporate Fraud/Securities Fraud, Health Care Fraud, Financial Institution Fraud, Insurance Fraud and Money Laundering.

The mission of the Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Unit (AF/MLU) is to promote the strategic use of asset forfeiture and to ensure that field offices employ the money laundering violation in all investigations, where appropriate, to disrupt and/or dismantle criminal enterprises.

The AF/MLU also has responsibilities for the management of the Forfeiture Support Project (FSP) in Calverton, Maryland.

The following notable statistical accomplishments are reflective in FY 2006 for Corporate Fraud: $1.2 billion in Restitutions, $41.5 million in Recoveries, $14.2 million in Fines, and $62.6 million in Seizures. (Comverse) is a New York-based designer and manufacturer of telecommunication systems and software, with reported revenues of $1.2 billion in FY 2005.

The chart below is reflective of the number of pending cases from FY 2002 through FY 2006. In August 2006, former Comverse Chief Executive Officer Kobi Alexander, former Chief Financial Officer David Kreinberg, and former General Counsel William Sorin were charged with various types of fraud related to illegal compensation of Comverse executives.

The FBI investigates matters relating to fraud, theft, or embezzlement occurring within or against the national and international financial community.

.2 billion in Restitutions, .5 million in Recoveries, .2 million in Fines, and .6 million in Seizures. (Comverse) is a New York-based designer and manufacturer of telecommunication systems and software, with reported revenues of

Although the FSP’s mission is closely tied to that of the AF/MLU, it does have a separate mission statement which is documented as follows: The mission of the FSP is to support the forfeiture component of all major FBI investigations through data entry and analysis of financial documents, forensic accounting, and tracing assets subject to forfeiture.Based upon field office crime surveys, current trends in the White Collar Crime arena, and directives established by the President, the Attorney General, and the Criminal Investigative Division, the following national priorities for the White Collar Crime Program have been established: Public Corruption, Corporate Fraud/Securities Fraud, Health Care Fraud, Financial Institution Fraud, Insurance Fraud and Money Laundering.The mission of the Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Unit (AF/MLU) is to promote the strategic use of asset forfeiture and to ensure that field offices employ the money laundering violation in all investigations, where appropriate, to disrupt and/or dismantle criminal enterprises.The AF/MLU also has responsibilities for the management of the Forfeiture Support Project (FSP) in Calverton, Maryland.The following notable statistical accomplishments are reflective in FY 2006 for Corporate Fraud: $1.2 billion in Restitutions, $41.5 million in Recoveries, $14.2 million in Fines, and $62.6 million in Seizures. (Comverse) is a New York-based designer and manufacturer of telecommunication systems and software, with reported revenues of $1.2 billion in FY 2005.The chart below is reflective of the number of pending cases from FY 2002 through FY 2006. In August 2006, former Comverse Chief Executive Officer Kobi Alexander, former Chief Financial Officer David Kreinberg, and former General Counsel William Sorin were charged with various types of fraud related to illegal compensation of Comverse executives.

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Although the FSP’s mission is closely tied to that of the AF/MLU, it does have a separate mission statement which is documented as follows: The mission of the FSP is to support the forfeiture component of all major FBI investigations through data entry and analysis of financial documents, forensic accounting, and tracing assets subject to forfeiture.

Based upon field office crime surveys, current trends in the White Collar Crime arena, and directives established by the President, the Attorney General, and the Criminal Investigative Division, the following national priorities for the White Collar Crime Program have been established: Public Corruption, Corporate Fraud/Securities Fraud, Health Care Fraud, Financial Institution Fraud, Insurance Fraud and Money Laundering.

The mission of the Asset Forfeiture/Money Laundering Unit (AF/MLU) is to promote the strategic use of asset forfeiture and to ensure that field offices employ the money laundering violation in all investigations, where appropriate, to disrupt and/or dismantle criminal enterprises.

The AF/MLU also has responsibilities for the management of the Forfeiture Support Project (FSP) in Calverton, Maryland.

The following notable statistical accomplishments are reflective in FY 2006 for Corporate Fraud: $1.2 billion in Restitutions, $41.5 million in Recoveries, $14.2 million in Fines, and $62.6 million in Seizures. (Comverse) is a New York-based designer and manufacturer of telecommunication systems and software, with reported revenues of $1.2 billion in FY 2005.

The chart below is reflective of the number of pending cases from FY 2002 through FY 2006. In August 2006, former Comverse Chief Executive Officer Kobi Alexander, former Chief Financial Officer David Kreinberg, and former General Counsel William Sorin were charged with various types of fraud related to illegal compensation of Comverse executives.

The FBI investigates matters relating to fraud, theft, or embezzlement occurring within or against the national and international financial community.

.2 billion in FY 2005.

The chart below is reflective of the number of pending cases from FY 2002 through FY 2006. In August 2006, former Comverse Chief Executive Officer Kobi Alexander, former Chief Financial Officer David Kreinberg, and former General Counsel William Sorin were charged with various types of fraud related to illegal compensation of Comverse executives.

The FBI investigates matters relating to fraud, theft, or embezzlement occurring within or against the national and international financial community.

The FBI focuses its financial crimes investigations on such criminal activities as corporate fraud, health care fraud, mortgage fraud, identity theft, insurance fraud, mass marketing fraud, and money laundering.

The majority of Corporate Fraud cases pursued by the FBI involve accounting schemes designed to deceive investors, auditors and analysts about the true financial condition of a corporation.

Through the manipulation of financial data, the share price of a corporation remains artificially inflated based on fictitious performance indicators provided to the investing public. While the number of cases involving the falsification of financial information remains relatively stable, the FBI has recently observed a spike in the number of Corporate Fraud cases that involve the backdating of executive stock options.

As of the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, 490 Corporate Fraud cases are being pursued by FBI field offices throughout the U.

S., 19 of which involve losses to public investors that individually exceed

The FBI focuses its financial crimes investigations on such criminal activities as corporate fraud, health care fraud, mortgage fraud, identity theft, insurance fraud, mass marketing fraud, and money laundering.

The majority of Corporate Fraud cases pursued by the FBI involve accounting schemes designed to deceive investors, auditors and analysts about the true financial condition of a corporation.

Through the manipulation of financial data, the share price of a corporation remains artificially inflated based on fictitious performance indicators provided to the investing public. While the number of cases involving the falsification of financial information remains relatively stable, the FBI has recently observed a spike in the number of Corporate Fraud cases that involve the backdating of executive stock options.

As of the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, 490 Corporate Fraud cases are being pursued by FBI field offices throughout the U.

S., 19 of which involve losses to public investors that individually exceed $1 billion.(1) Falsification of financial information, including:(a) False accounting entries(b) Bogus trades designed to inflate profit or hide losses(c) False transactions designed to evade regulatory oversight(2) Self-dealing by corporate insiders, including:(a) Insider trading(b) Kickbacks(c) Backdating of executive stock options(d) Misuse of corporate property for personal gain (e) Individual tax violations related to self-dealing(3) Fraud in connection with an otherwise legitimately-operated mutual or hedge fund:(a) Late trading(b) Certain market timing schemes(c) Falsification of net asset values(d) Other fraudulent or abusive trading practices by, within, or involving a mutual or hedge fund(4) Obstruction of justice designed to conceal any of the above-noted types of criminal conduct, particularly when the obstruction impedes the inquiries of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), other regulatory agencies, and/or law enforcement agencies.

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The FBI focuses its financial crimes investigations on such criminal activities as corporate fraud, health care fraud, mortgage fraud, identity theft, insurance fraud, mass marketing fraud, and money laundering.The majority of Corporate Fraud cases pursued by the FBI involve accounting schemes designed to deceive investors, auditors and analysts about the true financial condition of a corporation.Through the manipulation of financial data, the share price of a corporation remains artificially inflated based on fictitious performance indicators provided to the investing public. While the number of cases involving the falsification of financial information remains relatively stable, the FBI has recently observed a spike in the number of Corporate Fraud cases that involve the backdating of executive stock options.As of the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006, 490 Corporate Fraud cases are being pursued by FBI field offices throughout the U.S., 19 of which involve losses to public investors that individually exceed $1 billion.(1) Falsification of financial information, including:(a) False accounting entries(b) Bogus trades designed to inflate profit or hide losses(c) False transactions designed to evade regulatory oversight(2) Self-dealing by corporate insiders, including:(a) Insider trading(b) Kickbacks(c) Backdating of executive stock options(d) Misuse of corporate property for personal gain (e) Individual tax violations related to self-dealing(3) Fraud in connection with an otherwise legitimately-operated mutual or hedge fund:(a) Late trading(b) Certain market timing schemes(c) Falsification of net asset values(d) Other fraudulent or abusive trading practices by, within, or involving a mutual or hedge fund(4) Obstruction of justice designed to conceal any of the above-noted types of criminal conduct, particularly when the obstruction impedes the inquiries of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), other regulatory agencies, and/or law enforcement agencies.

billion.(1) Falsification of financial information, including:(a) False accounting entries(b) Bogus trades designed to inflate profit or hide losses(c) False transactions designed to evade regulatory oversight(2) Self-dealing by corporate insiders, including:(a) Insider trading(b) Kickbacks(c) Backdating of executive stock options(d) Misuse of corporate property for personal gain (e) Individual tax violations related to self-dealing(3) Fraud in connection with an otherwise legitimately-operated mutual or hedge fund:(a) Late trading(b) Certain market timing schemes(c) Falsification of net asset values(d) Other fraudulent or abusive trading practices by, within, or involving a mutual or hedge fund(4) Obstruction of justice designed to conceal any of the above-noted types of criminal conduct, particularly when the obstruction impedes the inquiries of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), other regulatory agencies, and/or law enforcement agencies.

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During FY 2006, the FBI investigated 490 Corporate Fraud cases resulting in 171 indictments and 124 convictions of corporate criminals.